Sunday, September 11, 2005

Silence

Sorry. I've been in D.C. all week. Back to blogging tomorrow.

Until then, read this column by David Broder:
In August, when the Congressional Budget Office lowered the deficit forecast to $331 billion, Republican Rep. Jim Nussle of Iowa, the chairman of the House Budget Committee, said, "We're clearly on the right track. The strong economy, higher revenues and falling deficit projections are all results of the successful leadership and policies of the Congress and the president."

These judgments were faulty at the time. They made no provision for the continuing costs of the war in Iraq, or for the Republican plan to end the estate tax and make all the previous Bush tax cuts permanent. And, most of all, they did not realistically calculate the costs of the new Medicare prescription drug benefit and the looming obligations to the millions of baby boomers who are nearing retirement age.

Now those pre-Katrina estimates have been rendered even more ridiculous. In the first 10 days since the storm hit, the president asked Congress for emergency appropriations of $62 billion -- and the bills are just starting to come in.

The question is whether this will force the president and congressional Republicans to suspend their obsessive drive to reduce the revenue base of the federal government, or whether they will finally start paying the bills their government is incurring.

3 Comments:

Blogger Doctor Biobrain said...

The question is whether this will force the president and congressional Republicans to suspend their obsessive drive to reduce the revenue base of the federal government, or whether they will finally start paying the bills their government is incurring.

No, the question is whether we'll ever be able to get rid of nitwits like Broder and introduce real journalists who might actually care about what's going on around them. The only damn way that the Republicans will stop their taxcut mania is if they believe that it is dangerous politically. And it'll take them a long time to see that, especially as most of their base loves taxcuts; so it's always a good appeal.

But in no case will the Republicans stop their taxcut mania solely for policy reasons. And Broder is a complete fool for not knowing this.

11:43 PM  
Anonymous Jim said...

And the answer is ...

' By late last week, Administration aides were describing a three-part comeback plan. The first: Spend freely, and worry about the tab and the consequences later. "Nothing can salve the wounds like money," said an official who helped develop the strategy. "You'll see a much more aggressively engaged President, traveling to the Gulf Coast a lot and sending a lot of people down there." '

(http://www.time.com/time/magazine/printout/0,8816,1103581,00.html - Dated 11 Spet. 05)

In other words, it's business as usual for the GOP, whose motto is: "We can't be broke, we still got checks left!"

Of course, using federal funds to help restore people's lives and their cities following such devastation is the right thing to do. Insisting on borrowing the money to do so instead of rolling back Bush's tax cuts is utter stupidity. Business as usual, again, for this mis-administration.

(On a kinder and gentler note, "Welcome back, Terry")

7:22 AM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

And they are still going to push for tax cuts -- oh wait!!-- "stimulus package."

12:01 PM  

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